The right to health refers to the fundamental human right to attain the highest possible standard of physical and mental health, without discrimination. This concept encompasses both freedoms and entitlements:

Freedoms include the right to control one's health and body (including sexual and reproductive rights) and to be free from interference (such as torture or non-consensual medical treatment and experimentation).

Entitlements include the right to a system of health protection (medical care and the underlying determinants of health) that gives everyone an equal opportunity to enjoy the highest attainable level of health.

The right to health is recognized in numerous international instruments, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 25), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Article 12), and other global health-related conventions. It implies that states must generate conditions in which everyone can be as healthy as possible. Such conditions include availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of health services, safe and potable water, adequate sanitation, sufficient food, decent housing, healthy working conditions, and a clean environment.

The right to health does not mean the right to be healthy, as that is impossible to guarantee. Instead, it requires that governments put in place policies and actions that create the conditions for people to lead healthy lives and provide access to quality health care services without causing financial hardship. This involves ensuring that health services are equitable and accessible to all, without discrimination, and that they are scientifically and medically appropriate and of good quality.

The right to health refers to the fundamental human right to attain the highest possible standard of physical and mental health, without discrimination. This concept encompasses both freedoms and entitlements: Freedoms include the right to control one's health and body (including sexual and reproductive rights) and to be free from interference (such as torture or non-consensual medical treatment and experimentation). Entitlements include the right to a system of health protection (medical care and the underlying determinants of health) that gives everyone an equal opportunity to enjoy the highest attainable level of health. The right to health is recognized in numerous international instruments, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 25), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Article 12), and other global health-related conventions. It implies that states must generate conditions in which everyone can be as healthy as possible. Such conditions include availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of health services, safe and potable water, adequate sanitation, sufficient food, decent housing, healthy working conditions, and a clean environment. The right to health does not mean the right to be healthy, as that is impossible to guarantee. Instead, it requires that governments put in place policies and actions that create the conditions for people to lead healthy lives and provide access to quality health care services without causing financial hardship. This involves ensuring that health services are equitable and accessible to all, without discrimination, and that they are scientifically and medically appropriate and of good quality.

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